Rapid Testing of Clostridium Perfringens

 
 

Reliable Testing Solutions for the
Detection of Clostridium Perfringens

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Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic, spore-forming and toxin-producing bacterium which can cause intense abdominal cramps, diarrhea and - in rare cases - necrotic enteritis (pig-bel syndrome). Small cell numbers may be present after cooking and multiply to food poisoning levels during cool down and storage of prepared foods. Typically, Clostridium perfringens will grow in foods that are high in starch or protein, such as cooked beans, meat products, thick soups, and gravy.

Merck offers a selection of products for the enrichment, sample dilution, detection and isolation of Clostridium perfringens. The range includes dehydrated culture media in a unique and user-friendly granulated format. These meet the highest industry standards for performance as laid out in ISO 11133.

Method ISO 7937 FDA BAM Chapter 16 FSIS MLG 13.00 /
FDA BAM Chapter 16
MLG 5.05
Isolation FSIS MLG 13.00 /
FDA BAM Chapter 16
Sulfite-Cycloserine Agar (TSC w/o egg yolk),
35°C;
20 ± 2 h,
anaerobic
TSC Agar w/ egg yolk, overlay w/o egg yolk, 35°C; 24 h, anaerobic
Confirmation Fluid Thioglycollate medium,
37°C / 35°C, 21 ±
3 h, anaerobic
Lactose Sulfite medium, 46°C,
21 ± 3 h / Nitrate Motility medium, 37°C, 24 h, anaerobic
Fluid Thioglycollate medium,
35°C,
21 ± 3 h,
Nitrate Motility medium,
35°C, 24 h,
anaerobic
Fluid Thioglycollate medium,
35°C,
21 ± 3 h
Nitrate Motility medium,
35°C, 24 h,
anaerobic

Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, spore-forming rod. It is widely distributed in the environment and frequently occurs in the intestines of humans and many domestic and feral animals. Spores of the organism persist in soil, sediments, and areas subject to human or animal fecal pollution.
The spores are heat resistant and are not killed by ordinary cooking. Some strains can survive 100°C (212°F) for up to 1 hour. Most cases of poisoning by C. perfringens are associated with temperature abuse of prepared foods. Small numbers of the organisms are often present after cooking and multiply to food poisoning levels during cool down and storage of prepared foods. Typically this bacterium will grow in foods that are high in starch or protein, such as cooked beans, meat products, thick soups, and gravy.

Clostridium Perfringens Infection

The common form of C. perfringens poisoning is characterized by intense abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Symptoms begin 8–22 hours after consumption of foods containing large numbers of C. perfringens bacteria capable of producing food poisoning toxins. The illness is usually over within 24 hours but less severe symptoms may persist in some individuals for 1 or 2 weeks. A few deaths have been reported as a result of dehydration and other complications. In rare cases, C. perfringens infections can also lead to necrotic enteritis (pig-bel syndrome). Deaths from necrotic enteritis are caused by infection and necrosis of the intestines and from resulting septicemia.

The infectious dose is typically greater than 108 vegetative cells. Toxin production is associated with sporulation in the digestive tract.

 
 
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이벤트

10월 15
10/15/18 - 10/16/18
13th Annual PDA Global Conference on Pharmaceutical Microbiology
Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center
Bethsda, MD, USA
Industrial Biomonitoring 북미 20181015